Coastal Tracks Preparing for Hurricane, Others Offering Assistance

Hurricane Florence, as seen from the International Space Station from Astronaut Ricky Arnold on September 10th. (NASA photo)

As Hurricane Florence roars through the Atlantic Ocean on its way to what appears destined to be a catastrophic impact in the Carolinas, coastal area race tracks prepare for impact.

Hurricane Florence is expected to make landfall somewhere between Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and Morehead City, North Carolina. The impact will likely be catastrophic to many coastal areas. Myrtle Beach Speedway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and Carteret County Speedway in Swansboro, North Carolina could be in the path of the storm depending on what direction it takes as it nears landfall.

Myrtle Beach and Carteret were both originally scheduled to run this Saturday night but have already canceled as both areas are being evacuated ahead of the storm. According to a Facebook post, Carteret has been secured by boarding up the facility and they’re prepared for the Hurricane’s arrival.

Dillon Motor Speedway which is 62 miles from Myrtle Beach is one of many tracks offering to evacuees to park their race trailers or campers at the track as the storm comes in. Track owner Ron Barfield also offered two buildings for anyone to stay in if they need it. Other tracks offering up parking and camping include Langley Speedway in Hampton, Virginia, Atlanta Motor Speedway in Hampton, Georgia and Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina.

Hurricane Florence is expected to reach clear across North and South Carolina as well as Virginia before it’s done. With heavy rainfall and sustained winds expected, several other area race tracks have canceled ahead of this storm — including Wake County Speedway in Raleigh, North Carolina, East Carolina Motor Speedway in Robersonville, North Carolina and Anderson Motor Speedway in Anderson, South Carolina. Other tracks with events this weekend are expected to cancel before Friday.

About the Author

Langley founded what you see today because he saw a gap in coverage for Late Model Stock Cars (LMSC), which race primarily throughout the southeast region. His passion and determination for LMSC helped grow the brand of not only Race22.com but the reputation of LMSC racing. He still leads the charge here today while he also works to help some of the regions tracks with their graphics, social media and promotion as well as promoting races and tracks from time to time to continue the growth of short track racing.