Reynolds Speaks Out, Says Pulliam isn’t Telling the Truth

Forrest Reynolds has been completely quiet since the incident on Saturday evening with Lee Pulliam, which was seen around the world in videos posted to social media.

Today, Reynolds awaits the decision from NASCAR but he said that things have got out of control and he felt he needed to speak out.  Reynolds is expected to get an indefinite suspension by NASCAR when the decision comes down later today.  Reynolds thinks that might be because of what he calls slander by Pulliam.

“I lost my temper and I should have never gone over the track but I did,” Reynolds told RACE22.com.  “I threw my radio and went over there to pull the ignition wires like I saw Peyton (Sellers) do a couple of years ago. He took off and I rolled down the hill but I definitely did not try to stab him. I don’t even know where all that stuff came from.

Reynolds is adamant that he did not have anything in his hands and never tried to stab Pulliam.

“I’m sure we can have the video enhanced to make sure that people realize that all I had was my radio and my headset in my hand.  I’d like to see the allen wrench or any puncture wounds if that’s the case but I’m standing flatfoot on the ground and just reaching for his wires. I don’t know it just seems really fabricated.

He says if he was trying to get to Lee he wouldn’t have gone to the right side of the car.

“If I was trying to get to Lee I would have just gone to the driver’s side. I was just trying to demobilize his car.  In my head, if we couldn’t finish the race, he wasn’t going to either. And that’s where all that led to. I just tried to stay quiet afterward and not say nothing but it’s all got twisted and confused and a lot of slander my direction which I don’t feel like it’s helping.”

Reynolds knows he shouldn’t have gone on the race track but says he was just angered by Pulliam destroying his new car.

“That’s about it, I shouldn’t have gone on the track and I shouldn’t have thrown my radio. I just got a lot of hours in that new car and I never thought it would explode to the level it at and the views and shares and what not.”

Reynolds thought as he was walking toward his pit area, which was near where the cars were stopped under the red flag and he saw Pulliam’s car and thought that Pulliam was gesturing to him.

“I just saw him in there and I thought he was waving his fingers at me and I just lost it and went out there and threw my radio. I should have thrown it from the inside the pit area and maybe I wouldn’t be in this situation. The problem was our trailer was parked right there and I was kinda walking to our pits and the closer I got I was furious still that he dumped us the way he did and tore everything up.”

Reynolds says he doesn’t know what his penalty will be and that he hasn’t talked to the track.

“I haven’t talked to the track at all. I’ve just been waiting to hear what was going to go down. A lot of the stuff Lee said just isn’t true. He spent two or three hours on that radio show about me the other day and tried to drag a lot of my personal life into it. Which isn’t relevant I don’t feel like.”

When asked about his personal issues and where they might have spilled over in the recent event where Reynolds left his crew at the track and then this issue, he suddenly put the conversation on hold.  When he came back, he said he was talking to his lawyer and that he couldn’t say any more.

“I just want to let people know I didn’t freakin’ try to stab him. It was aconsciouss decision to throw my radio and to pull his ignition wires out. I just talked to my lawyer and I’m not going to be able to say much more.”

About the Author

Langley founded what you see today because he saw a gap in coverage for Late Model Stock Cars (LMSC), which race primarily throughout the southeast region. His passion and determination for LMSC helped grow the brand of not only Race22.com but the reputation of LMSC racing. He still leads the charge here today while he also works to help some of the regions tracks with their graphics, social media and promotion as well as promoting races and tracks from time to time to continue the growth of short track racing.