Top 5: Takeaways from the Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach

At every race there’s plenty of things that take place that fall under the radar but here’s five thing that should stand out from the Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach Speedway.

Weather Fears

A rainy forecast kept many racers at home for fear of the race being rescheduled after they arrived.

The forecast for the Icebreaker was much worse than the actual weather that greeted fans, drivers and teams. That weather forecast kept some teams at home for the season kick-off event including 4-time NASCAR Whelen All-American Series National Champion Philip Morris. Morris was set to make his first start at Myrtle Beach Speedway in 18 years and was scared away by the forecast. 27-cars took the green flag with around 10-12 cars missing in action presumably because of the weather which was never a factor.

Practice Crash Ends Johnson’s Weekend

Justin Johnson lays on the track after a hard hit when his throttle hung during practice for the 2018 Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach Speedway. He would walk away but his car was destroyed and he was unable to race. Redmoon Photography Photo

Justin Johnson was looking forward to his first race in a Jason Stanley prepared, Robert Tyler owned car but was sidelined shortly after practice started when his throttle hung. His car was destroyed but luckily Johnson was only sore following the crash. Johnson will be back on the track at Tri-County Motor Speedway in the CARS Tour test in three weeks.

Bouncing Back

Matt Bowling (83) races by Jacob Heafner (95) on the outside as he maneuvered his way from a last place start to finish fifth in the 2018 Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach Speedway. Corey Latham Photo

Matt Bowling’s qualifying effort went awry about the time he entered the track to take time. His engine had issues and his team had to change out the new power plant. He had to start last but he wasn’t going to stay there. Riding the TORP House car, Bowling drove through the field and avoided all incidents en route to a fifth-place finish.

Who’s Going to Fill Lee’s Shoes?

Justin Milliken (02) races ahead of eventual race winner Timothy Peters (12) in the 2018 Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach Speedway. Corey Latham Photo

Chad McCumbee and Justin Milliken finished the best among the local Myrtle Beach area drivers but for the second season in a row, they’re just missing something that’s keeping them from being the drivers to win. Lee Pulliam dominated the 2017 season winning 14 of 18 starts with locals winning just three races (Milliken twice and Matt Cox once) with Tommy Lemons, Jr. winning a race Pulliam didn’t compete in and Josh Berry winning the Myrtle Beach 400 after Pulliam crashed out.

So who’s going to be the one to dominate this season? Timothy Peters dominated the Icebreaker weekend winning the pole and the race but lucky for the competition he isn’t expected to compete full time. McCumbee, Colby Howard and Matt Cox spent time at the front of the field while Milliken found his way to a third-place finish. Those four drivers look to be the ones who could compete for the championship this season with the absence of Pulliam and with no other outsider figuring on running every event.

Never a Factor, But Could Be Soon

Sam Yarbrough raced in the top ten for much of the race but never found himself really in contention for the top spot in the 2018 Icebreaker at Myrtle Beach Speedway. Jaden Austin Photo

One of the drivers expected to have a great run this weekend was Sam Yarbrough. He was piloting a new entry for Robert Elliott Trucking. He showed some good speed at times but was never able to become a factor in the race. He’s another driver who if he can get the setup right could very well have a dominating performance and lead the charge this season.


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Langley Austin

Langley Austin

Langley founded what you see today because he saw a gap in coverage for Late Model Stock Cars (LMSC), which race primarily throughout the southeast region. His passion and determination for LMSC helped grow the brand of not only Race22.com but the reputation of LMSC racing. While he’s not as involved today as he once was he’s still the driving force behind race22.com and is continuing to grow LMSC racing by promoting tracks and events throughout the region.